Hong Kong to maintain Fukushima export ban

By RJ Whitehead

- Last updated on GMT

Hong Kong, accounting for a quarter of Japan’s food export trade, is among 55 countries that have blocked shipments from Fukushima. ©GettyImages
Hong Kong, accounting for a quarter of Japan’s food export trade, is among 55 countries that have blocked shipments from Fukushima. ©GettyImages
Seven years after a tsunami wiped out a nuclear reactor in Fukushima, causing widespread radiation contamination in a largely agricultural region, the prefecture continues to struggle in getting crucial overseas markets to accept its produce.

This is despite a charm offensive that saw Japanese foreign minister Taro Kono visiting Hong Kong last weekend for the first time in 21 years to lobby chief executive Carrie Lam to lift a ban on imports from Fukushima and its surrounding region.

Hong Kong, which accounts for a quarter of Japan’s food export trade, is among 55 countries that have blocked shipments from Fukushima since the 2011 disaster.

Facing resistance

The trip did not go the way Tokyo planned, with Lam expressing her reluctance to reopen trade.

She emphasised that it is incumbent upon the [government] to safeguard public health and hence effective measures must be in place to ensure food safety and to maintain public confidence​,” a statement issued by Lam’s office read.

The visit came shortly after South Korea announced it would maintain a blanket ban on imports from north-eastern Japan, even though the World Trade Organisation (WTO) ruled this as “arbitrary and unjustifiable​” discriminatory measures.

Korea’s trade ministry stated in March that it would appeal the WTO decision, which is equivalent to a court ruling.

Despite this ruling, the current import ban will remain in force, and the government will make its utmost efforts to ensure radiation-contaminated food does not reach the dinner table​,” it said in a strongly-worded statement, ahead of a likely appeal.

Radiation safe?

Meanwhile, a Fukushima flatfish festival in in Bangkok was forced to cancel amid pressure from consumer goods watchdogs over radioactive contamination.

According to Japanese officials, food from the affected area is safe, with no radiation having been detected in rice since 2015. In January, a safety panel announced that contamination inspections would be phased out in favour of random spot checks, to bring rice in line with the current procedure for fruits and vegetables.

This position is backed up by the Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO) of the United Nations, whose director-general publicly ate sweets made from pears and apples grown in Fukushima at an event in Tokyo last May to publicise the safety of produce in the affected area.

We don’t see any reason to raise concern about the safety of food​,” Jose Graziano da Silva said at the time.

Just a year after the nuclear incident Japanese authorities began adopting the strictest radiation standards of any country in the world by lowering the accepted level of contamination by half.

But persuading prime export markets that Fukushima food is safe is proving to be tremendously difficult.

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